Ralph Anderson Lectures

The 20th Ralph Anderson Lecture 2017

The 20th Ralph Anderson lecture was delivered by Dr Mathew Burke, Head of Drug Delivery in the Platform Technologies & Science Department at GlaxoSmithKline.

His talk was entitled “Polymers to herald in a new age of medicine.

Dr Burke is a subject matter expert on oral modified release and continuous manufacturing and has worked at multiple sites in the US and UK within GSK.  He has 30 articles, patents and presentations.

He has served as an adjunct professor at North Carolina State University Biomolecular and Chemical Engineering department and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Pharmacy.

Polymers and plastics have played a key role in the development of medicinal products and therapies for several decades.  The application of polymers ranges from packaging materials to device components to formulated drug mixtures that are administered as oral pills or injectable products.  Much has been achieved but there is still much to learn as medicine evolves into the digital age and we discover new ways to improve patients’ lives through the application of novel approaches such as bio-electronic implants and the evolution of artificial intelligence and the human-machine interface.

The 19th Ralph Anderson Lecture – 9th November 2016

“Nature-Inspired Chemical Engineering: A NICE approach to innovation and sustainability” Given by Professor Marc-Olivier Coppens

Dr Coppens is Ramsay Memorial Professor and Head of Chemical Engineering at University College London (UCL), where he also directs the Centre for Nature-Inspired Chemical Engineering (NICE), which includes researchers from chemical engineering and chemistry to computer science and architecture.
Exciting times are ahead as evolution over a very long period of time has made Nature a treasure trove of clever solutions to sustainability, resilience, and ways to efficiently utilize scarce resources. For instance, we have learned a lot about the design of composite materials from detailed understanding of the structure of horn.

Professor Coppens’s multidisciplinary research aims to draw lessons from nature, from the molecular level to large structures in order to engineer innovative solutions to our grand challenges in energy and energy efficiency, fresh water production, materials, health, and living space.

His lecture illustrated many of the ways that scientists of today can learn from nature. The lecture was opened my our Master, Hugh Moss; Professor Coppens was introduced by the Chairman of the Polymer Committee, John Russell, and afterwards was thanked by our Upper Warden Alison Gill.

Held at the headquarters of the Royal Society for Medicine in Wimple Street, the Lecture was followed by an excellent buffet supper for the attendees which included the Masters of several Livery Companies and guests from the Polymer Industry.

The 18th Ralph Anderson Lecture – 11th November 2015

“Horns, Polymers and Polymaths: creativity, innovation and education for the 21st century”

Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff studied at King’s College, Cambridge, B.A (1969) and Ph.D. (1973) under the supervision of J. J. Turner FRS on the Matrix Isolation of Large Molecules. In 1972, he was appointed Research/Senior Research Officer in the Department of Inorganic Chemistry of the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. In 1979, he moved to a Lectureship in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Nottingham. Promotion to Reader in Inorganic Chemistry and then to Professor of Chemistry followed in 1985 and 1991 respectively.

In addition, he is Honorary Professor of Chemistry at Moscow State University. From 1994-99, he held an EPSRC/Royal Academy of Engineering Clean Technology Fellowship at Nottingham. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Society (2002), of the RSC (2002) and of the IChemE (2004). He was awarded CBE (2008) for “Services to Sciences”, made Honorary Member of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia (2008) and Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences (2011). In 2012, He was elected a Fellow of the Academia Europiaea and, in 2013, Associate Fellow of TWAS, the World Academy of Science. He was a Council Member of the IChemE (2009-13) and Foreign Secretary and Vice-President of the Royal Society (2011-16). His research interests are focused on supercritical fluids, continuous reactions and their applications to Green Chemistry. Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff was knighted in the Queen’s New Year Honours 2015.

Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff’s lecture suggested how we might begin to educate the next generations of chemists and materials scientists so that they can address future challenges in a sustainable and creative way.

The 17th Ralph Anderson Lecture – 11th November 2014

“The Livery Companies and Education – A Scientific Perspective”.

Sir John Holman spoke to a very large audience at the Ralph Anderson lecture on November 11th 2014. The lecture had everything – amusing anecdotes, simple science questions that stumped many of the audience, very illustrative experiments which tested the skill and trust of the Master, but most of all a quality presentation which was highly informative and thought provoking.

Addressing the question why education is so important, Sir John focused on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). It is estimated that an additional 40,000 STEM graduates are needed each year and stressed that science careers were not ‘the preserve of men’. Encouraging children to consider education options leading to STEM qualifications was not easy and there is need for a change in the mindsets of many parents and politicians. One area where members of the livery could play an essential role was where they were appointed as governors in schools and colleges. Reference was made to some work sponsored by the Welcome Trust helping governors to ask challenging questions and finding ways to celebrate and improve.

Sir John concluded his talk by referring to three things those livery companies could do more: help schools engage with employers to provide authentic career guidance; as governors, ask the right questions about science and mathematics in your school; carry the banner for technical and vocational education.

The 16th Ralph Anderson Lecture

‘Plastic Electronics’ given by Professor Sir Richard Friend FRS FREng.

Sir Richard Friend is Cavendish Professor at the University of Cambridge and Tan Chin Tuan Centennial Professor at the National University of Singapore.  In general terms, his research concerns the physics and engineering of carbon-based semiconductors.

 

In detail, his research has been applied to development of polymer field effect transistors, light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic diodes, optically pumped lasing and directly printed polymer transistors.  He pioneered the study of organic polymers and the electronic properties of molecular semiconductors.  He is also one of the principal investigators in the new Cambridge-based Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration on nanotechnology and co-founder of Cambridge Display Technology and Plastic Logic. Sir Richard has over 600 publications and more than 20 patents.

He has also be examining the development flat panel displays and future screens that can be rolled and transported.  He is the founder of the company Cambridge Display Technology Ltd which aims to capitalise and bring to market the first products using this latest semiconductor technology.

Sir Richard co-founded  “Cambridge Display Technology” company in 1992 following the research at the Cavendish Laboratories, Cambridge, on the world’s first plastics (roll-up) TV and LED display screen which won him the Horners’ Award in 1998.

 

Plastic Electronics

 

Over the past two decades we have learned how to make carbon-based molecular materials behave in silicon-like ways. We can now make displays, electronic paper or solar cells from materials that are very thin and inherently flexible. To date these are found in conventional consumer products such as cell phone displays. Beyond this we can expect new functions, new design and new uses well outside the current scope of ‘electronics’. Taking a new material from laboratory to the high street is however a long process, with many unexpected twists and turns along the way

The 15th Ralph Anderson Lecture

“Polymer Prescriptions”

Are Plastics Really Fantastic? Robert Hill gave us a most interesting lecture on the ways in which plastics have assisted new developments in clinical medicine and dentistry. Rober Hill is Professor of Dental Physical Sciences and is Heads of Dental Physical Sciences at Barts and The London Medical School. Formerly he was Professor of Biomaterials at Imperial College London.

Professor Hill is a Polymer Scientist and undertook his PhD at Imperial College under the Supervision of Dame Julia Higgins investigating Phase Separation in Polymer Mixtures. He was part of the Materials Group at the Government Chemist awarded The Queens Award for Technology for the development of Glass Ionomer Cements in the 1980s. Professor Hill’s interests are focused on Materials for Hard Tissue Replacement including bone and tooth.

Professor Hill’s lecture “Polymer Prescriptions” focused on how polymer materials are used to replace hip joints, treat fractured bones, treat osteoporosis of the spine and to restore and repair damaged teeth.

The 14th Ralph Anderson Lecture

“Are Plastics Really Fantastic?”

The Master gave the 14th Lecture at the Royal Society of Medicine in this splendid building which has recently undergone extensive refurbishment and now provides state of the art lecture and entertainment facilities.

Our Master has been in the Plastics industry for over 45 years and is a well known figure in both the UK and the European Industry. Until 2004 he was the CEO of the privately owned Linpac Group which grew to become one of the largest plastics processing companies in the World with over 50 plants operating in every continent.

He is a Fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining and a Member of the Chartered Management Institute.

David is proud of his “roots”: Having joined Ekco Plastics in 1963 as an Apprentice Plastics Engineer. As well as gaining invaluable, practical shop-floor experience he studied Polymer Technology at Borough Polytechnic, now South Bank University and Industrial Management at what is now Anglia Ruskin University.

He was the President of the British Plastics Federation in 1988 and President of the European Plastics Converters Association (EuPC) from 2003 – 2009. EuPC represents over 50,000 plastics processing companies throughout the EU. He remains a member of the Steering Board and is the Chairman of the EuPC Packaging Division.

Since the 1980’s David has devoted a considerable amount of his time to education and training initiatives within the Plastics Industry and through the Horners Company. He was Chairman of the Plastics Processing Industry Training Board and its successor body, the British Polymer Training Association.

Although officially “retired”! He is still actively involved in the industry as a strategic advisor to several businesses in the UK and as Chairman of Macro Plastics Inc, USA and Mpact Plastic Containers, South Africa.